the trouble with citizen assemblies (part 3)

So those who of us who aren’t fans of citizen assemblies as a decision making process aren’t found too often in the press, but we are out there. Andrew Potter’s recent blog post may hopefully be thing beginning of a better debate about the merits and pitfalls of this process.

I haven’t seen much press assessing the citizen assembly process. If anyone’s seen any articles about the process (not the outcome) please send them along.

[tags]Citizen Assemblies, democratic renewal[/tags]

2 thoughts on “the trouble with citizen assemblies (part 3)

  1. Peter

    We need these articles, but unfortunately there’s been precious little long-form writing about the citizens’ assembly and its membership that would help us better understand the fundamental differences between it and a Legislative Assembly. I’d love to see a serious treatment of the assembly and a thoughtful article putting the whole process in a political and historical perspective. We also need profiles on the members that probe their thinking. Paging Valpy, Potter, MacGregor, Hebert…

    Postscript:

    1. Come to think of it, if Doug Saunders had discovered this story in the Netherlands where they recently ran a similar, smaller citizens’ forum on electoral reform, I suspect the slant would have been all glowing admiration for those clever, progressive Europeans.

    2. And while thinking of it, where is up-with-citizens left on this? Why can they troop down to Porto Allegre and sing the praises of participatory budgetting — but board the bus to osgoode hall?

    Reply
  2. Peter

    We need these articles, but unfortunately there’s been precious little long-form writing about the citizens’ assembly and its membership that would help us better understand the fundamental differences between it and a Legislative Assembly. I’d love to see a serious treatment of the assembly and a thoughtful article putting the whole process in a political and historical perspective. We also need profiles on the members that probe their thinking. Paging Valpy, Potter, MacGregor, Hebert…Postscript: 1. Come to think of it, if Doug Saunders had discovered this story in the Netherlands where they recently ran a similar, smaller citizens’ forum on electoral reform, I suspect the slant would have been all glowing admiration for those clever, progressive Europeans. 2. And while thinking of it, where is up-with-citizens left on this? Why can they troop down to Porto Allegre and sing the praises of participatory budgetting — but board the bus to osgoode hall?

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.