The death of MMP

Anyone who’s followed this blog semi-regularly knows I’m not a fan of MMP so it’s no surprise that I’m pleased to see MMP was soundly thumped in the referendum today. What is remarkable is how soundly the resolution was defeated (63% to 37% at last count).

As a result, the best thing about this outcome is its decisiveness. Unlike BC, Ontario won’t be burdened with another referendum on the issue (as unfortunantely BC will likely be).

11 thoughts on “The death of MMP

  1. Scott Tribe

    I suppose that 50% turnout rate for tonight’s vote must warm your heart too eh, David?

    The status quo’ers and backroom boys won out tonight – both from the utter lack of ability Elections Ontario showed in adequately informing people about this referendum question and why it was chosen.. to the fear-mongering that went on in the media.

    Reply
  2. Scott Tribe

    I suppose that 50% turnout rate for tonight’s vote must warm your heart too eh, David? The status quo’ers and backroom boys won out tonight – both from the utter lack of ability Elections Ontario showed in adequately informing people about this referendum question and why it was chosen.. to the fear-mongering that went on in the media.

    Reply
  3. david

    Scott: I thought the Elections Ontario ballot was biased towards MMP, since it mentioned which option the Citizen’s Assembly supported (when’s the last time you saw a political endorsement printed right on a ballot?). Remember that they’re supposed to be neutral.

    There was no organized anti-MMP campaign (other than the occasional e-mail chain), while the public boulevards were plastered with pro-MMP signs apparently backed by a lot of campaign dollars. Still, MMP lost decisively both ways — riding by riding, and in the province-wide popular vote — so this is about as clear and fair a result as you can expect from Ontario voters.

    Reply
  4. david

    Scott: I thought the Elections Ontario ballot was biased towards MMP, since it mentioned which option the Citizen’s Assembly supported (when’s the last time you saw a political endorsement printed right on a ballot?). Remember that they’re supposed to be neutral.There was no organized anti-MMP campaign (other than the occasional e-mail chain), while the public boulevards were plastered with pro-MMP signs apparently backed by a lot of campaign dollars. Still, MMP lost decisively both ways — riding by riding, and in the province-wide popular vote — so this is about as clear and fair a result as you can expect from Ontario voters.

    Reply
  5. Mark Francis

    The Citizen’s Assembly was not political, so it’s not an endorsement.

    The people in my community were just plain confused about the whole thing. The few people I met who understood it, supported it.

    MMP signs? There were signs?

    One error of the YES campaign is that you couldn’t identify what it was about by looking quickly at the materials. “MMP” – what’s that?

    Reply
  6. Mark Francis

    The Citizen’s Assembly was not political, so it’s not an endorsement.The people in my community were just plain confused about the whole thing. The few people I met who understood it, supported it.MMP signs? There were signs?One error of the YES campaign is that you couldn’t identify what it was about by looking quickly at the materials. “MMP” – what’s that?

    Reply
  7. Jeremy Vernon

    I just arrived in Toronto in the midst of the MMP controversy. There were posters/stickers/spray paint tags on vertually any flat surface clear across campus (UofT). So clearly some people wanted it.

    I learned everything I need to learn to dislike it from the official explanatory literature – since I didn’t want to chance being misinformed by some other source. In fact, the promotional literature shoved at me by student slacktivists made it sound less appealing than the neutral literature.

    I think that the determination it was confusing is bunk. Based on my highly unscientific polling (I live in a residence of 1000 people and asked as many people as I could get to hold still about it – I’m that special kind of obnoxious) I couldn’t find anyone that was didn’t understand MMP and therefore was prepared to vote against it. Moreover, I found plenty of people who could describe in meticulous detail what about the system they disliked.

    Reply
  8. Jeremy Vernon

    I just arrived in Toronto in the midst of the MMP controversy. There were posters/stickers/spray paint tags on vertually any flat surface clear across campus (UofT). So clearly some people wanted it.I learned everything I need to learn to dislike it from the official explanatory literature – since I didn’t want to chance being misinformed by some other source. In fact, the promotional literature shoved at me by student slacktivists made it sound less appealing than the neutral literature.I think that the determination it was confusing is bunk. Based on my highly unscientific polling (I live in a residence of 1000 people and asked as many people as I could get to hold still about it – I’m that special kind of obnoxious) I couldn’t find anyone that was didn’t understand MMP and therefore was prepared to vote against it. Moreover, I found plenty of people who could describe in meticulous detail what about the system they disliked.

    Reply

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