Gov 2.0: If I could start with a blank sheet of paper… (part 1)

I was recently invited to be a member of the International Reference Group of the Australian Government’s Web 2.0 Taskforce. Like with the British – who drafted this excellent report – I’m impressed the Australian government is thinking about Web 2.0 comprehensively and strategically, and that it was reaching out internationally to a group of subject matter experts. It is of course an issue I spend a lot of time thinking and writing about.

Recently, the taskforce posted this piece on their blog:

“…imagine for a moment it was your job to create the guidelines that will help public servants engage online. Although you have the examples from other organisations, you are given the rare luxury to start with a blank sheet of paper (at least for this exercise). What would you write? What issues would you include? Where would you start? Who would you talk to?”

While they were looking for suggested guidelines for how employees should interact on the web like those found here (a lot of these are great – I was impressed with DePaul University’s guidelines) I wanted to take a step back. Guidelines are important, but the posts implicitly suggests the focus of a government’s web 2.0 strategy should be focused externally. If I had a blank slate I would write guidelines, but my emphasis would be to get public servants to start using Web 2.0 tools internally. This approach has several advantages:

  1. Start with a safe environment for individuals to learn: As a medium the internet is a notoriously complicated place to communicate. Flame wars, endless and pointless discussions, and even simple misunderstandings are commonplace. I’d like a place where public servants can get comfortable with both the medium and the different Web 2.0 tools. People forget that only a tiny fraction of people have embraced Web 2.0 and most public servants are not part of that early adopter group. Throwing public servants into the deep end of the Web 2.0 pool risks setting them up to drown out of frustration. Creating Web 2.0 tools behind a government firewall gives public servants a lower risk environment to get comfortable and learn to use the technology.
  2. Start with a safe environment for institutions to learn: Developing a new communications culture, one where more public servants are accustomed to engaging with the public directly will take time. Giving public servants an opportunity to practice using social media behind the government firewall enables the organization to assess its strengths and weaknesses and determine what policies should be in place as it further ramps up its public facing engagement.
  3. Make mistakes internally first: For better or for worse, many government agencies are deeply sensitive to communication mistakes. An innocent gaffe that goes viral or is picked up on by the media can quickly temper a minister’s or deputy minister’s appetite to experiment with social media. Every ministry or department will, at some point, experience such a gaffe (most probably already have). Better that these initially happen internally where they can become learning experiences than having them happen publicly where they become communications crises that risk shutting down Government 2.0 experiments.
  4. Internal focus will drive much needed structural change: Building off point number 2, I frequently tell government officials interested in having their organizations “do” social media to stop thinking of this as a communications exercise. Rather than trying to get an analogue government to talk to a digital public – why not make the government digital? Adopting Web 2.0 tools internally is going to change how your organization work for the better. Social media allows people to more effectively exchange information, identify critical resources and avoid the duplication of effort – all of the types of things siloed, hierarchical governments aren’t good at. The fact that adopting these tools will make engaging in the online world much, much easier is only one of many much larger benefits.

All this isn’t to say that Governments shouldn’t engage with the public via social media/web 2.0. They should (they need to!). It is to say that there is huge value, learnings and efficiency gains to be had in adopting web 2.0 internally. If we focus exclusively on the external strategy  we risk only changing how our governments communicate with the public and miss out on the real gains of transforming how our governments work.

6 thoughts on “Gov 2.0: If I could start with a blank sheet of paper… (part 1)

  1. Pingback: Glyn Moody (glynmoody) 's status on Monday, 26-Oct-09 17:20:29 UTC - Identi.ca

  2. CraigThomler

    Amen.The analogy I always think of are post it notes.3M (whose employees created the product) did not see market value in the product until one of it's creators gave packs of post it notes to the secretaries of senior managers.After trying the product internally, the secretaries decided they could not live without them and pressured management to market the product. The success of the product is history.Similarly if we can introduce social networking an collaboration tools to public servants they will both become proficient in their use (over time) and understand how and when they can b deployed externally for maximum value.So the next question becomes, how do government departments overcome any internal issues that restrict the use of internal web 2.0 tools?Such as management disinterest, fear of loss of control, restrictive IT policies and budgets and lack of internal expertise?

    Reply
  3. bottree

    Forcing evolution is a hard thing to do!It seems that one of the greatest challenges right now is the fear of failure within public circles brought on by the political implications of public 'innovation' and the level of scrutiny delivered by media organizations. Right now, there's a disproportionate level of attack aimed at any government efforts to change how they do things. Look at the gun registry at the federal level or the eHealth issues that dog the Ontario government. It's because of this that I think it will be a long time before public institutions are comfortable using an array of social tools, but I think user CraigThomler is right: a good part of the evolution will have to come internally. However, any government would be prudent to advise their employees and managers on 'best practices' to avoid getting into embarrassing situations.Following that, public demand for such services will (hopefully and) inevitably force governments to work with open-source tools and products.

    Reply
  4. bottree

    Forcing evolution is a hard thing to do!It seems that one of the greatest challenges right now is the fear of failure within public circles brought on by the political implications of public 'innovation' and the level of scrutiny delivered by media organizations. Right now, there's a disproportionate level of attack aimed at any government efforts to change how they do things. Look at the gun registry at the federal level or the eHealth issues that dog the Ontario government. It's because of this that I think it will be a long time before public institutions are comfortable using an array of social tools, but I think user CraigThomler is right: a good part of the evolution will have to come internally. However, any government would be prudent to advise their employees and managers on 'best practices' to avoid getting into embarrassing situations.Following that, public demand for such services will (hopefully and) inevitably force governments to work with open-source tools and products.

    Reply
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