Eaves.ca Blogging Moment #7 (2009 Edition): Explaining the New to the Old

Back in 2007 I published a list of top ten blogging moments – times I felt blogging resulted in something fun or interesting. I got numerous notes from friends who found it fun to read (though some were not fans) so I’m giving it another go. Even without these moments it has been rewarding, but it is nice to reflect on them to understand why spending so many hours, often late at night, trying to post 4 times a week can give you something back that no paycheck can offer. Moreover, this is a chance to celebrate some good fortune and link to people who’ve made this project a little more fun. So here we go…

Eaves.ca Blogging Moment #7 (2009 Edition): Explaining the New to the Old

This year I felt the Opinion page of the Globe needed a loyal opposition. With pretty much every columnist over 50 and most over 60 I was getting tired of hearing how social media was destroying media (and democracy) (it isn’t), global warming didn’t exist, twitter was useless (it isn’t), Palin is a better orator than Obama (she isn’t) and young people don’t care about their country (they do)

If you’ve tuned out of the Globe’s opinion page don’t worry, you’re not alone. You likely are either:

a) under 40;
b) use the internet;
c) think evidence and science matter; or
d) all of the above

The only reason it is depressing is that I believe the Globe matters and I fear they’ve given up on attracting readers who answered (a) to the above.

However, protesting has led to lots of fun, including this debate with Michael Valpy (him, me, him, me) and this response to Lawrence Martin’s piece which, more exciting still, became part of the reading list for Queen’s Pols 110 course.

5 thoughts on “Eaves.ca Blogging Moment #7 (2009 Edition): Explaining the New to the Old

  1. uninvoked

    Younger people do care about the country. All those dead people in Iraq? Those soldiers fighting for their country? Yeah. They don't need dentures. >_>

    Reply
  2. Tired of Hype

    “c) think evidence and science matter; or”I find this odd coming from you, since not only are many of your observations rather thin on science/evidence, but you don't even seem to understand the difference between an assertion and a argument.The mainstream media is of course dead (and good riddance) but at this point, all of you over-exuberant “social media” enthusiasts are going to have to become a little more critical and a little more discipline when you discuss the paradigm that's coming to displace.I for, one, reject categorically that younger people care about democracy. They care about important things, of course (although usually only those things that impact them or their peer group in some way), but I don't get the impression they really understand democracy, nor understand that it exists within a tradition that just can't be abandoned without serious consequences.There's nothing wrong with being 50, by the way. I've been on the Internet constantly since 1988, have gone through cycles of transformation and innovation and have accumulated something younger people can only get with time and experience: wisdom. You might try and factor that in the next time you're being so categorical about the value of what you are particularly focused on. And you'll be 50 too one day, sooner than you think.

    Reply
  3. David Eaves

    Tired of Hype – sorry the post rubbed you the wrong way.Moreover, (a), (b) and (c) were not inclusive but exclusive. I suspect that anyone over 50 but who also either uses the internet or thinks science is an important tool also is frustrated with the Globe's (a) page. (It was an either not an and). The problem is that there is only one generational perspective on the globe – and for the rest of us it is tired and uninteresting and not that engaging. So, I certainly don't think there is anything wrong with being 50 (I definitely will get there faster than I think – and frankly most of the coolest people I know are over 50). I just hope that when I get to that age I'll leave a little space to some different voices at some different stages of their life.

    Reply
  4. Tired of Hype

    “c) think evidence and science matter; or”I find this odd coming from you, since not only are many of your observations rather thin on science/evidence, but you don't even seem to understand the difference between an assertion and a argument.The mainstream media is of course dead (and good riddance) but at this point, all of you over-exuberant “social media” enthusiasts are going to have to become a little more critical and a little more discipline when you discuss the paradigm that's coming to displace.I for, one, reject categorically that younger people care about democracy. They care about important things, of course (although usually only those things that impact them or their peer group in some way), but I don't get the impression they really understand democracy, nor understand that it exists within a tradition that just can't be abandoned without serious consequences.There's nothing wrong with being 50, by the way. I've been on the Internet constantly since 1988, have gone through cycles of transformation and innovation and have accumulated something younger people can only get with time and experience: wisdom. You might try and factor that in the next time you're being so categorical about the value of what you are particularly focused on. And you'll be 50 too one day, sooner than you think.

    Reply
  5. David Eaves

    Tired of Hype – sorry the post rubbed you the wrong way.Moreover, (a), (b) and (c) were not inclusive but exclusive. I suspect that anyone over 50 but who also either uses the internet or thinks science is an important tool also is frustrated with the Globe's (a) page. (It was an either not an and). The problem is that there is only one generational perspective on the globe – and for the rest of us it is tired and uninteresting and not that engaging. So, I certainly don't think there is anything wrong with being 50 (I definitely will get there faster than I think – and frankly most of the coolest people I know are over 50). I just hope that when I get to that age I'll leave a little space to some different voices at some different stages of their life.

    Reply

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