The best moment in Canadian democracy in 2010?: the census debate

Over at Samara, my friend Alison Loat is asking people to answer the question “What was the best moment in Canadian democracy in 2010?” In what I think was a good decision, they’ve defined the terms pretty broadly, stating:

The moment could be one that took place inside or outside of Parliament or other legislative chambers.  It could have happened at the federal, provincial, territorial or municipal level.  It could include any number of things, such as an election with a historic turnout, a stimulating public debate, a rally or protest, a critical piece of news analysis, the creation of a new digital application, or an important Parliamentary motion or decision.

If you’ve got an idea I encourage you to hear over there and write it up and submit it! The Samara people are great and are up to good work, so definitely worth checking out.

I’ve got one answer the question myself – what follows is my write up. I think I may even have one more in me… but here’s my first effort:

The Census Debate as Canada’s 2010 democratic moment.

In a functioning democracy disagreement is necessary and healthy. But at its core there most be some basic agreement – some shared understanding of who we are, as a people and as a society. This shared understanding not only serves as the basic facts that must inform our debates but also the basis of our shared identity that keeps us together even when we disagree.

This is why the census is so important, and why it is my choice for the best moment in Canadian democracy for 2010. The census binds us together by creating a shared understanding of who we are. Even the most marginalized Canadians stand up and are counted and thus can be reflected and heard in our national discourse.

That’s why at a time when Canadian political coverage tries to cleave the country’s citizens into different, competing groups – rural versus urban, French versus English, left versus right – I think the best moment in Canadian Democracy was seeing over 500 groups including all levels of government, non-profits from across the country, business organizations, rural communities, and virtually all the major religious organizations come together and challenge the government with one voice.

What a great democratic moment that so many organizations, that often disagree on so many issues, can collectively agree on a core shared interest: that a functioning democracy and an effective government is built on a foundation of some basic information about who we are. Even more so when the government tried to make the decision in secret, announcing it quietly on a friday, during a long weekend in the middle of summer.

The decision and the process surrounding it may be one of the year’s darkest moments for Canadian democracy but the country’s reaction was definitely one of our brightest.

5 thoughts on “The best moment in Canadian democracy in 2010?: the census debate

  1. Pingback: Tweets that mention The best moment in Canadian democracy in 2010?: the census debate | eaves.ca -- Topsy.com

  2. David Tallan

    I can see where you are coming from, but this doesn’t really seem like an example of “democracy” to me. As I understand it, we get democracy when we are properly represented in our governing bodies and government decisions align with the “will of the people”. If that doesn’t happen, we don’t really have democracy – rather, some other form of governing (oligarchy, bureaucracy, autocracy, etc.).

    So, for just the reasons that you see it as an example of democracy (all these groups came together to express the “will of the people”) for me it was the opposite (the will of the people had no effect on the governing decision).

    Reply
  3. Neil Edmondson

    I submitted “BC Politics Goes Squirrelly”. With two leadership contests on the go, a recall campaign underway, and an upcoming HST referendum, the democracy, it is palpable in BC at this moment.

    Reply

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