Today: "right to know" panel for parliamentarians

Today from 10am-12am EST I’ll be a panelist for Conference for Parliamentarians: Transparency in the Digital Era a panel convened by the Office of the Information Commissioner as part of Right to Know Week. Apparently the Canadian School of Public Service will provide access to this conference as part of its Armchair Discussions (www.righttoknow.ca).

More on the panel:

This conference aims to engage Parliamentarians in a debate and reflection on the new paradigm that the digital world has introduced for the right to know. Greater transparency in the digital era requires more than sound information management and the use of state-of-the-art information technology. It calls for a fundamental change of attitudes from disclosing information on a need-to-know basis to managing information with the presumption of disclosure as the default mode. How can public institutions trigger and accelerate this change of attitudes for the benefit of Canadians?

For those who are interested you can see my slides (sans audio, I’m afraid) below.

4 thoughts on “Today: "right to know" panel for parliamentarians

  1. Jacques Drolet

    I can not stop comparing the EU political involvement and information sharing already established and used by civil society and what we have here. Open government could bridge and I understand that the change of context can unsettle some minds but there two aspects to consider to move forward: (i) free trade and equity existentially depend on this improvement, (ii) the controlled-society alternative is mining our potential(as individual and as a country) as we speak and takes away our validity as an International partner. Note: You may want to check Jorge Heine's lecture at Carleton U :-)

    Reply
  2. Jacques Drolet

    I can not stop comparing the EU political involvement and information sharing already established and used by civil society and what we have here. Open government could bridge and I understand that the change of context can unsettle some minds but there two aspects to consider to move forward: (i) free trade and equity existentially depend on this improvement, (ii) the controlled-society alternative is mining our potential(as individual and as a country) as we speak and takes away our validity as an International partner. Note: You may want to check Jorge Heine's lecture at Carleton U :-)

    Reply
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  4. Pingback: Open Data – USA vs. Canada | eaves.ca

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